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.m. eastern here on c- span. ," ours weeks "newsmakers guest is the ceo of heritage action for america. he talks about his organization's agenda and its position on issues pertaining to health care and immigration. here's a preview. [video clip] >> in this environment right now, it is very difficult to handle immigration the way we should be. which is bypassing piecemeal pieces of legislation, getting the border secure. we also have a gigantic imbalance between labor supply and labor demand. all of those questions do not require amnesty. you can get all of the economic benefits that people talk about in fixing our broken immigration system without giving amnesty at this time. that is the position we support. unfortunately in this environment right now, the moment something passes the house, the pressure on immigration, which has dissipated over the last couple of weeks and months, will immediately be back in the forefront. >> you can watch the entire interview with michael needham of heritage action form for america on newsmakers -- on "newsmakers" sunday at 10:00 a.m. eastern and 6:00 p.m
" bankht an intern for bank of america found dead after working nearly three straight days. police a defense lawyer says the jury is stacked against this teenager who is charged with shooting a baby between the eyes right in front of his mother. >> i can't believe that they could shoot a baby in the face. >> shepard: the defense claims the accused killer is not getting a fair trial. >> one black male on a panel of 48 people. >> shepard: tonight, the push to start over and the ruling from a judge. plus police say three teenagers were bored so they decided to cale college student for fun. >> it was well thought out. >> something -- >> >> shepard: we will hear from the mother of one of the suspects. and high school students claim they are uncovered an oreo ripoff. >> it looks like the stuffing on the double stuff is slightly less than a real double stuff oreo. >> double stuff is less than oreo. >> tonight the cookie company responds. but first from fox this tuesday night. a 21-year-old intern at bank of america collapsed and died after he reportedly worked three back-to-back shifts of
of america through the senses. the population reached 17 million in 26 states. we consistently see 30%. slaves #2.5 million, which is almost 15% of the population, and new orleans joins the list of the largest cities in the united states. we heard about the tylers and their attitude toward slavery. give us an indication of what was happening in 1840. >> this is a tremendous time of sexual tension. we like to think the country is divided regionally, that everyone in the north is anti slavery and everyone in the south is proslavery. it is not that simple. people in the north benefited from slavery and the slave trade until it was ended. they now move into a different economic arena. they no longer need slavery, and slippery as a threat to them because of the free labor system in the north, and the kinds of the economy that is needed to preserve institutions in the north are different from those in the south, so what is happening in congress is both groups want to control legislation, because if you are in more industrialized regions, we want certain parts of laws passed to preserve the
with paula broadwell, he is reinventing himself in america's media capital, taking a teaching gig. >> life doesn't stop with such a mistake and can and must go on. >> reporter: petraeus joins a long line of officials who were involved in scandals. public reasonings expert has covered everyone to -- take immediate responsibility. apologize to the right people, his wife and the american people. and remove yourself from controversy, meaning don't fight to stay on as cia director. it didn't hurt that the president granted petraeus a graceful exit. >> he has provided this country an extraordinary service. >> what could be a more attractive thing than that kind of sendoff. >> reporter: but his past hasn't been perfect. he was set to make $150,000 for teaching students three hours a week. >> my initial reaction was outrageous. >> reporter: the doctor says most would get $3,000 for teaching that seminar, and the school's mission is to provide an affordable session. >> once again, it's how he is quick on his feet. i would say before the ink was dry on that first story there was no story. >> reporte
it is america's weakness, we're showing we're afraid of al qaeda, closing embassies. on the other hand, god forbid another attack happens and we weren't prepared and didn't vacate some people and heard these threats, a lot of us at this table would say we should have closed embassies. we have assets and fast response teams in spain, bahrain, italy, the marine expeditionary unit in the middle east ready to go. this is clearly by the size and scope of it, 21 embassies, 4 consulates, the scope of this tells you there's a credible threat. this is going to be something that they believe in nature, al qaeda and arabian peninsula likely. maybe it wasn't a bad idea to close some of these. >> it does, andrea, seem overbroad. maybe they have reason to because they have enough chatter to know something is going on, not sure, perhaps it is a way to draw out the terrorists, trying to figure out, pinpoint who it is. >> i hope that's it. it is one of two things. one, the threat is credible, it is serious, and the reason for the silence could be that this administration just a couple weeks ago during memor
" special investigation, the truth about benghazi. for nearly a year, america has been searching for answers about the deadly attacks that took the lives of four americans, including ambassador christopher stevens, information officer sean smith and two former navy s.e.a.l.s. that search for answers could not be any more relevant than tonight, as u.s. embassies and consulates around the world are closed or on high alert. prevents another attack means getting to the truth of what happened there. we go back to benghazi of where it all began to investigate why all the attacks happened. plus, john king gets to the bottom of the talking points and the evolving story coming out of washington in the days and weeks after the attacks. to presidential politics lead to a coverup? and what did the families of the four lost americans want most? you'll hear from them directly. but first, we go back to the hours before the attack. september 11. in america, a day of solemn remembrance. in 2012, a day of violence in the middle east. demonstrators storm the u.s. embassy in cairo, angry over a low-rent film ma
there. what is great about what we've seen with america over the last several years is how resilient we are. after the boston bombings, for example. the next day, folks are out there, going to ball games, making sure we are not reacting in a way that somehow shuts us down. >> right. >> and that is the right reaction. terrorist depend on the fact we will be terrorized. we are going to live our lives and the odds of people dying in a tourist attack are still a lot ,ower than in a car accident unfortunately, but there are things we can do to make sure that we're keeping the pressure on these networks, that will try to injure americans. it is the first thing i think of when i wake up in the last thing i think about before going to bed, is keeping americans safe. host: that was the president last night on "the tonight show" with jay leno. ken walsh has written this piece available online that the president's appearance on "the tonight show", part of his effort to expand the presidencies outreach more widely than ever. other presidents have limited themselves to more traditional approaches su
in america. >> caution, you are about to enter the no spin zone, the factor begins right now. >> thanks for watching us. new revelations about the benghazi attack. that's the subject of this evening's talking points memo. so fox news has learned. >> now some are being swim intimidated into staying silent. the officers have been forced to take lie detector tests to persuade them about what really went on that night. pretty odd, my opinion, the wrong people are getting the polygraphs. why not susan rice or hillary clinton, or the president himself. >> that's the memo, now for the top story. two different views on this. fox news's military analyst, author of the big new book, terror red. now before we talk about the cia, i want to address these emkbasz e embassy closings. . why do we tell everything about it. >> first of all, we get threats every day. on the hour where these embassies are now being closed. what's happening and this one is our agency's intelligence community, in collaboration with -- what we have done, though, is extend the ban on travel until the end of the month. so there
african american to pursue a job. >> tackling the race issue in america. bill's interview with the founder of black entertainment television, robert johnson. the factor begins right now. >> hi, i'm greg gut feld in for bill o'reilly. thanks for joining us. new revelations about the benghazi attack. fox news learned at least five cia employees were forced to sign extra non-disclosure agreements following the attack aimed at preventing leaks i guess. cnn reported dozens of cia personnel were in benghazi and now some are being intimidated into staying silent reportedly forced to have lie detector tests as a way to persuade them from saying about what happened that awful night. my opinion, the wrong people are getting the polygraphs why not susan rice? hillary clinton? or the president himself? i only would have one question, who pushed the video? that is it. because underneath the phony denials and blame and cover up, it's one missing truth. why was america told that antiislam video was blamed for a spontaneous attack that wasn't spontaneous at all? we know the answer. a planned terrorist att
bream. live from "america news hq" starts now. information about what's behind the massive closures is slowly trickling in, but so are new details about the timing and how the administration is handling the threat. steve centanni has more. >> the president is getting regular updates and today lawmakers spoke out about the danger. >> there's been an awful lot of chatter, chatter about the planning that's going on, very reminiscent of what we saw around 9/11. >> as a result 20 embassies and consulates were closed throughout the middle east and north after ka. it's called them to step up their activities in the wake of killings of top terrorists. there were prison breaks including one in aleppo, syria, this weekend that have freed al qaeda operatives over the last month. lawmakers who are being briefed say we know less about the location of the possible attack than the timing. listen. >> the assumption that it's probably most likely to happen in the middle east at or about one of the embassies, but there's no evidence of that at all. it could be in europe or the united states. >> they
and north africa. and issues an extraordinary worldwide travel alert to america. >>> plus, new questions about relations with russia. after moscow grants asylum to edward snowden. >> russia has stabbed us in the back. each day that snowden is allowed to roam free is another twist of the knife. >> now the white house is rethinking whether the president should meet with russian president putin. >>> plus, growing controversy about the surveillance of americans here and overseas. we'll talk with general michael hayden. as well as nsa critic congressman justin amash of michigan. >>> then, washington keeps heading for a budget impasse and government shut down. >> we have seen a faction of republicans in congress saying they wouldn't pay the bills congress racked up in the first place. >> instead of working together yesterday the president threatened to shut down the government. >> we'll ask house majority leader eric cantor if they can make a deal before the deadline. all right now on fox news sunday. >>> hello again from fox news in washington. we begin with a terror threat that's prompted th
's a significant threat stream, and we're reacting. >> the latest threat will likely revive america's memories of the scary second week of last year when islamists rioted at three western embassies, culminating on the fatal attack on the u.s. consulate and annex in benghazi. >> it is possible we may have additional days of closing as well. of course depending on our analysis. individual u.s. embassies and consulates will announce whether or not they are open or implementing restrictions or other measures. >> president obama is at camp david this morning, returning to the white house later today, said to be receiving regular briefings on the al-qaeda threat and our response. chris? >> the terror alert comes as russia has granted nsa leak edward snowden temporary asylum. there are growing demands in congress to impose new limits on the government surveillance of americans. joining us now to discuss all this in new york general michael hayden, former head of the nsa and the cia. and here in washington, republican congressman justin amash of michigan who led an effort to restrict the nsa's data co
of its kind in america, to enable information sharing across the austin medical community. -- austin medical community. medicalgency -- boston community. the reaction after the attack was not accidental. it was a product of years of training and investment in the link state and local capacity and the quick, orderly, focused, and comprehensive response by law enforcement, first responders, and the larger boston community on that day saved lives. immediate control over the scene by law enforcement and assistance from first responders and medical personnel helped you entry theack fallen fallen and injured, a scenario they have practiced to ensure no one facility would be overwhelmed. citizens stepped up and played a critical role, it hearing for the wounded, donating blood, and submitting videos that helped -- aify the suspects powerful reminder of the role the public lays in providing aid but also providing useful information. the reason why after i became secretary, i called for the creation and then expansion of the argument " if you see something say something" campaign, expanding i
to continue to make employer contributions to their health plan. basically law americas and congressional staffers. they say a number of senators reportedly expressed concern over hike in healthcare costs due to the implementation of obama care. they don't want to get crushed by the change of benefits. this as the irs chief tells congress he would rather stick with his current healthcare plan. >> why are your employees trying to exempt themselves from the very law that you are enforce. >> to speak for myself i prefer to stay with the current policy i am pleased with rather than go through a change if i don't need to go through the change. >> he is planning one of a number of votes to continue to chip away at obama care. this time to prevent the irs from implementing the law really showing lack of approval of the agency in the wake of the allegations. at the same time the president has made it a permanent irs commissioner. white house officials say former freddie mac chairman has the experience to resort confidence in the agency. >> elizabeth prann in washington. thanks. >>> a fox business
't like america. >> reporter: out of 12 witnesses to take the stand this first day, one was shot in the massacre not once but seven times. he was very calm and collect on the stand. when it came time to be cross-examined by major nidal malik hasan, he had no questions for him. >> casey siegel at fort hood, thank you. >>> former president george w. bush is recovering at a hospital in dallas. they found an artery blockage. they inserted a stint earlier today. let's talk about it with fox news medical analyst dr. siegel from new york. what happened? >> we heard from his senior spokesperson who said he was going to cooper for his regular physical. he was having no symptoms. the physical in terms of being a former president, as vigorous as he is, includes a stress test. it showed some ekg changes. that led them to do a special cat scan which showed a blockage, then came the angiogram, where they fed a catheter up through an artery in the groin up to the heart to the blocked artery which they then opened. i have the stint here with me. you can see this tiny balloon is dilated, and this
did that have to do with anything? america, your complete name is your father's surname and your mother's maiden name. that is running. i do not know that. i was home, and i went to my mother [[ spanish] in practiced. uis -- spanish] in [applause] [speaking in spanish] what a wonderful name that i found. the next day i went back to the a youngm and there was girl in the corner and i walked up to her because i had practiced all night, right? i said, hola, hi. luis gutierrez. she raised her hand. --y called her mister [speaking in spanish] [laughter] i am happy you laughed, because that was reaction of the 30 other students in the classroom. they all laughed. it today.h about but it really informs me about how i live my life and who i am, because while everybody was laughing, i never felt so small, so insignificant, so disconnected from everything around me, so humiliated. it is difficult to describe how alienated i felt from everything around me, how alone i felt. you know something? when the laughter stopped -- [speaking in spanish] [indiscernible] we know they exist here in amer
to keep america safe for 7 1/2 years.[applause] and it worked. the record speaks for itself. the cia put out a classified report in 2004. ksm was subjected to enhanced interrogation. a report was published, classified by the cia, and it has been declassified, although it still has parts redacted. the headline is "khalid sheik mohammed preeminent source on al qaeda." that is the place where we learned most of the intelligence we had, at least in the mid part of our time there, about what al qaeda was about, about where they were based, how they were funded, where the training camps were. on 9/11 we did not know that. we knew osama bin laden was in pakistan, but that was the extent of our knowledge. the way we kept the country safe was get that intelligence and according to the agency itself, the way we did that was by subjecting him -- because he was subjected more than anybody else to enhanced interrogation techniques. this administration does not get it. they do not. obama made a speech here not too long ago to the national defense university in may and basically said ok, now we are ret
enemies, and he's made it more difficult for our security services to keep america safe. now with regard to the russians, i think i agree with the senator from new york. it's a bit of a slap in the face. i know the administration is reconsidering the visit in moscow after the g-20 with president putin. frankly i don't think president obama should go. maybe just betrays my own personal background, chris, but i think it's a jump ball whether he should go to saint petersburg for the g-20 at all. >> you've been on the fringes of it. let's get directly into this question of the nsa, what it's doing, whether should be new limits. general, the house almost passed, as you well know last week, a measure offered by congressman amash, that would have put an end to the kind of blanket collection of phone records of all americans, and instead limit that only to information on americans who were under specific investigation for links to terrorism. on a practical level, general, would that have hamstrung you? >> oh, chris, it would have turned the program on its head. look, this isn't -- this program,
with bush, that america would, as he obama has been saying, it's standing in the world as a new high. it's at a rather low when we have to our embassies, unprecedented closings around the muslim world. i'm not second-guessing the call. we obviously have a lot of chatter, as he they say. it tells you the wreckage that the foreign policy. >> peter: wreckage. >> alisyn: wreckage, you could say it's the wreckage of the obama foreign policy or as tucker was saying us they hate us, they always have. it's not because of george bush. it's not because of our policy. it's because they are homicidal maniacs. they want to kill children. >> tucker: personal style. they thought bush was dumb. that's why they attacked us. it was so false from day one. >> alisyn: meanwhile, we do have other news to get to. here are your headlines. we have brand new information on that multi-state. >> salad was served in olive garden and red lobster restaurant. health officials are still trying to determine if the salad mix is responsible for the outbreak in the other 14 states. and it could be his last home run for a ve
, everybody, i'm bill hemmer live here in "america's newsroom." she's come back for more pain and punishment. patti ann: not at all. i'm in for martha maccallum today, and senior u.s. officials say the intelligence is specific, and it points to terrorists setting off surgically-implanted devices. former cia director michael hayden says closing the embassies could be more than just caution. >> well, that's the cost of doing business, and i understand the argument that it seems to, as you say, empower them more than perhaps they're really capable of performing. on the other hand, you have a real danger to americans. you want to be cautious and let me add an additional factor in here, chris, the announcement itself may also be designed to interrupt al-qaeda planning, to put them off stride, to put them on the back foot, to let them know that we're alert and that we're on at least to a portion of this plot line. bill: so that with chris wallace on sunday morning. peter doocy live this morning out of washington. good morning to you. the latest on these threats, what can we report? good morning. >
they could go to college in america because of their immigration status, zuckerberg decided to get involved. >> i went home and talked to friend who is run tech companies and we decided to try to do our best in helping out and creating this organization that would hopefully push to get comprehensive immigration reform done. >> reporter: the result was forward.us, a political organization that has in a few short months run $5 million in tv advertising, mobilized grass roots support in a number of states and retained washington lobbying firms on both sides of the aisle to push its cause. senate aides say the group's efforts were instrumental in getting the bill passed in the upper chamber but a real test will come this fall when legislation is up for debate. >> there's no way legislation will pass in the house now. clearly there are a number of republicans in the house who would like to pass a bill, grab the support of zuckerberg and others, pass the border security stuff, get those things enacted and take the pressure off a come pensive bill. >> reporter: while this is zuckerberg's first att
's religions utile flowers from the same garden. i was at a gathering of evangelicals around america. and this includes clerics from the muslim world. an improbable gathering. for three days people worked and struggled with the effort to find the common ground. in fact between all the religions and philosophy. whether a new order confucianism or any of the other different approaches this is tied together. by the golden rule. and they all come from the same human heart. leaders and citizens, particularly people in public life, everyone talks about how we draw strength from the example of our faith-based communities. but not enough people actually translate those words into actions or policies or life philosophies. so i think that whether it's teachers are activists or religious leaders, working to heal others, we learn a great deal. it stands in stark contrast to violent extremists seek to destroy and never talk about building a community or providing health care with anybody. so we need to recognize that in a world where people of all faiths are mingling like never before, where we a
then will america do? what will iran do? what will russia do but i started off, mr. speaker, by making a reference for the first world war, next year we are going to be commemorating the stinking great of the events of august 1914. and those events have a worrying parallel because you have a series of actions and reactions which drew in an escalating fashion one country after another. nobody thought that the assassination of an obscure archduke woodley toward world event. this is a powder keg and we should not be lobbing weapons into the heart of such combustible material. >> we will break away from this british house of commons debate on syria at this point. were expected this debate to continue for several hours with possible votes later today. taking a look at democratic congressman saying there's no vital national security involved, even if it's in government has proved to deliver did use chemical weapons, which -- republican scott wigle tweets what's happening right now in british parliament should be happening in the u.s. congress. moral issue. is a death caused by chemical weapons wors were
in south america were shut down because of security concerns. and in 1999, six embassies in africa were closed also for security reasons. >>> now from preventing a terror strike to cleaning up, fox news learned about steps the obama administration is taking to keep a lid on what happened in last fall's benghazi attacks. chief washington correspondent james rosen has new information tonight. >> reporter: veterans of the intelligence community tell fox news they never witnessed the kind of sensitivity to press leaks that top officials at cia are exhibiting on the subject of benghazi. one cia source describes it as, quote, a nuclear blanket. >> why are these heroes told not to talk? what is the administration afraid of? what is it protecting? >> reporter: amid reports of cia administering polygraph tests to benghazi survivors, reports agency spokes men dismissed, they learned of five cia personnel on the ground in benghazi the night of september 11 that were forced to sign nondisclosure agreements, even though all five already signed such documents with the clear understanding they were be
. the russians have opened their arms to the man who has spilled some of america's deepest secrets. also in world news, what exactly was the cia doing in benghazi libya when a terrorist attack claimed the lives of three of our americans? the extraordinary measures they are taking to keep you from learning the truth. >> and our pop culture lead. daytime tv has never been the same since she gave up her talk show. at first much of her audience did not follow her when she launched her own network, but you should know by now oprah, well, she doesn't do failure. welcome back to "the lead." it's time for our world lead. edward snowden certainly had plenty of time to study his english, the russian phrase book. it's going to come in handy now that he's been granted russian political asylum. it will last for a year, we're told, and he'll enjoy the sweet, sweet liberty allowed under vladimir putin. earlier today the moment snowden has been waiting for finally arrived. he left the airport and completed ghosted the reporters waiting outside. his lawyers told reuters he gave them their status and he was gone.
hemmer here in "america's newsroom." jaime: i'm jamie colby in for martha maccallum here today. that appears to be good news, right? digging deeper into the report it was one of the only good signs. americans are seeing hours and pay drop. that is not all. rick: stuart varney, host of "varney & company" on the fox business network. stu, you hear numbers of jobs created, unemployment rate goes down, how is that a bad thing? >> 162,000 new jobs is disappointing. that is an understatement. that is quite dismal. if you dig even deeper into this full report you see some pretty shocking things. number one, 240,000 people dropped out of the workforce. they just quit trying. that is how the unemployment rate came down to 7.4%. a quarter of a million people dropped out. then we have part-time work up, by 174,000, to a record 28.2 million. there are 28 million people in america working part time. and that number is rising. it has never been higher. obamacare may have something to do with that. rick: stu, the labor participation rate. this is number about people who dropped out because it
's old obama for america campaign organization now called organizing for america is trying to, well, i guess they're going to mount a campaign to try to get young people to pay for their health insurance, to start buying their health insurance. that is going to be a tall order, it would seem to me, to try to convince people to voluntarily go out and spend hundreds of bucks a year on health insurance just to live up to the obamacare standards. chris frates, thank you very much. >> thank you, jon. alisyn: and did you watch this yesterday? ariel castro sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole plus a thousand years. he pleaded guilty to kidnapping, murder and rape charges after holding those three young women captive for years. we have all of the details from the dramatic sentencing hearing. and what castro's life will be like from now on. >>> and monday's reportedly the deadline for more than a dozen major league baseball players to census pensions for ties to the sport's latest drug scandal. the big names on the list, and what could happen if they do not take that de
wanting to attack america, wanting to attack the west, and it was really, i think, only a matter of time before something like this would happen. now because it's out in the open, people are talking about it. but i can assure you the intelligence committee is confident the cia, dia, homeland security, all of them, are constantly on the lookout for planned attacks such as this because this is what ultimately motivates al qaeda and its affiliates. so while i was not expecting this plan in particular, anyone who is involved in this can't be surprised that an attack like this could be planned. >> and so given that, you mentioned that there is so much material that comes across your purview all the time and the intelligence committee all the time, but certain decisions are made about what to make public and what to keep quiet. do you worry that informing possible terrorists of the closures on this sunday of the embassies and consulates really could provide too much information to assist these potential extremists or terroris terrorists? >> it's a balance. and a decision had to be made, i assu
.s. diplomacy and advance america's interests. couple ofing a minutes late. we will have live coverage when it does get underway here on c- span. >> once again, live pictures from the state department. secretary of state john kerry excited to name shaun casey to head the state department's first office that is dedicated to out reach the global faith community and religious leaders. wayside this to get underway in just a moment. some news out of the white house this morning, if you are listening to "washington journal" this morning, rushing to in -- president obama planning to cancel a one-on-one meeting with russian president putin. it is in retribution to russia's decision to grant asylum to nsa security leaguer edward snowden. it is also first-rate with rush on an array of other issues including missile defense and human rights. says obama still plans to attend the g 20 summit, but a one-on-one meeting with president putin has been postponed. president obama will also at a stop in sweden to his early september travel itinerary. in a statement today, senator schumer, democrat of new york,
.m. eastern here on cing span 3. c-span2. >> c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public service by your it's provider -- by your television provider. >> host: and this week on "the communicators," gordon smith who is president and ceo of the national association of broadcasters, our guest reporter is paul kirby of telecommunications report. senator smith, you started at nab nearly four years ago. how have the issues changed in those four years? >> guest: well, it seems like the issues just keep on coming, and they tend to be very major issues affecting both radio and television. but clearly on the radio side, the whole issue of performance rights, performance tax, whatever you want to tribe it as, is an ongoing challenge. hopefully, the day will arrive when both the digital and the terrestrial platform can come up with a model that actually grows music and works for both. but right now one has an unsustainable business model, and the other one works for radio, but on the other hand, we need it to work for the performers too. but if you provide a rate t
as the american people are concerned there is only one way america's greatness will be restored again for americans and made to feel good and that is to have strict term limits for congress. both parties in congress kill america's greatness and the only ways to have single term limits for them. dagen: good to see you, thank you so much, passionate as always. maybe a jolt for the bowls, that is what chevy is hoping. general motors cutting the price tag on the 2014 model of the electric car by $5,000 comes in now, sticker price for the 2014 model just under $35,000, factory in the full government tax credit and the final tally could be as low as $27,000 and you get some state tax credits depending on where you live. gold sales did fall 3% last month but they are a 9% so far this year. the price could help clear the way for the company's new cadillac e l r which will be based on the same technology. if you don't like the chevy volt trimmings you can get yourself another one. gm stock is down 2%. the price of the chevy volt not the only thing taking ed did. u.s. trade gap in june hitting
collaborating deeply. >> why shouldn't they? america is so weak. why should they not collaborate, as they have against american interests? >> fannie mae and freddie mac on the way out? we will see. >> for too long, these companies were able to make that knowing that if they went bad, taxpayers would be left holding the bag. >> the president imposed restructuring, proposed restructuring.fading out fannie mae and freddie mac. housing is doing well. fannie and freddie is profitable. as of next month, they will have paid back about 146 billion of government loans.>> the president was disingenuous there. these folks made all of these this money. we encourage them to do that. they were pushed to do it. they pushed the money out the door to do it. barney frank, god bless him, they were the ones that pushed fannie mae and freddie mac to do this. >> they backed 90% of new mortgages? >> that they should not have. they were buying this stuff up. >> what happens if they go away, fannie mae and freddie mac? >> they should. >> what if they do? >> the problem is they will have to phase of government support,
that he wants america to be loved. he made a tour of the muslim world early on we are going to respect you and early relationship and open hand to iran, a reset with russia. this is the idea that america somehow if nice will be treated well. this is the fruits of being benghazi, having our ambassador attacked and nothing happening to the bad guys. a result of russia we warned about snowden. there will be consequences. russia holds him, there are none. threatening iran saying you will be held accountable, and then on syria, the president of syria has to go and he will be held accountable if weapons of mass destruction are used. there is no sense anywhere in the world if you kill an ambassador and attack a u.s. ambassador you ignore it and you stick a finger in its eye that anything will happen to you. i think they have a sense now they -- i'm talking about al qaeda and the terrorist and they can spread and grow wherever they strike they will be relatively unmolested and the fact obama talking talks about ending the war as if he can declare tended is an intricate element of that. >> bret: kr
of outfrontment we start with stories from the front lines. we're going to start with a good day in america. automakers with their best sales in july before the great recession. toyota and gm seas were up. ford, it was 11%, but that's the best july for ford. they have been up for 24 months running. the numbers says as ford is going to offer an f-150 on natural gas. but edmonds senior editor tell us he's found natural gas for as little as 92 cents a gallon. >>> you are guy is about to be the first country in the world to legalize marijuana. the committee mists report that they would be allowed to grow up to six plants at home. what is that? they say that 40 grams is about 80 joints. >> we told us a couple of weeks ago about an actual paper version of shindler's list. you might have seen steven spielberg's shindlers list, he saved more than 1,000 jewish refugees by hiring them in his factory. the auction house trying to sell it tells us there are still multiple parties they say are interested in purchasing it. >>> where did anthony weiner come up with the name carlos danger? he was asked that
and concerned about things. >> that is on my business card. >> we replicate the procedures that america follows of authorizing stuff by legislation , setting decisions by court, supervising it by inspector general's. done in a to be secret way in order that enemies do not find out about it and could therefore it made it. that is the way it goes. >> and do not exclude the possibility of new legislation. if congress wants to fix it, they have oversight abilities to hear all this material in classified form and decide whether they want to tweak the law. >> you would prefer to see, i suspect, open debate before the supreme court, but you could go the congressional route to address the concerns you have raised. >> i guess they each have their own functions. one determines what the legislation should be. one determines what is constitutional. my preference would be that both get their shot at it. but that is just me. more,oing to ask only one because i am told there are 20 minutes remaining, and i want to give you time on the floor. briefly, would each of you give your observations on civil , a board
-year-old in america it's time for the minimum wage to go up. (cheers) but i won't be able to do it alone, so i'm going to be calling... on all of us to take up this cause. good jobs; a better bargain for the middle class... and the folks who are working to get into the middle class; an economy that grows from the middle-out. that's what we need. (cheers) what you want to do is-- have you already enrolled? you're doing fine. what did that just do? select what? select the drop-down menu. it looks like you're already enrolled. oh, ok. oh. example here. so... don't panic. you're ready to make your payment. "submit." there it is. oh, my god! i really can't believe it. that's awesome. good for you. ha ha! ♪ and i would walk 500 miles >>> this would be good music for the moose when it comes up. welcome back t to the gif, it is friday, august 2nd, i'm chris cuomo. >> good morning everybody i'm kate bolduan. coming up in the show what happened in ariel castro's house for some ten years was horrific enough but what on earth was going on in his head that entire time i don't think anyone can know. we'll talk ab
. >> nobody in america is getting those benefits. >> you're exactly right. you don't get the benefits and you don't get the subsidies. the government, i.e., you, the taxpayer, mark simone, have to subsidize this fabulous plan for members of congress and their staffs. >> that was the quickest action i've ever seen from the federal government when they thought they would have it --? they were panicked. >> tell us the reason that everybody else gets away with it. >> i have to get out of here. our panel was great tonight and nan hayworth and mark simone and everybody campaign for nan hayworth because she won't say a bad word. thanks, everybody. i'm kudlow. i'll be back monday. i sometimes do say bad words. have a great weekend, everybody. u to eat more fiber. chewy, oatie, gooeyness... and fraudulence. i'm in deep, babe. you certainly are. [ male announcer ] fiber one. all your important legal matters in just minutes. protect your family... and launch your dreams. at legalzoom.com we put the law on your side. [ sirens wailing ] >> a war is raging in mexico's border towns as rival drug cartels bat
is phil mudd. senior research fellow at new america foundation and also worked for the cia and the fbi. thanks for being with us, phil. >> good morning. >> so, i'm wondering. the u.s. is saying there is no new threat. we've passed sunday, which was the night of power. what some observers have said would be an aspisuspicious day carry out an attack. is this just an abundance of caution? >> i think it's an abundance of caution. remember we're still in the wake of benghazi where people criticize the government for not doing enough and also probably an indicator of the credibility of the source of the information. when i was looking for a decade at the threat matrix, the matrix of threats coming to the u.s. government at the fbi and cia. on a rare occasion you get information credible enough in terms of the sourcing that you would want to warn the american people and i'm sure that's what's happening in this case. >> the "new york times" is describing it as a strange wait and see climate describing a threat that is specific and maddingly vague. that's what a lot of us covering it feel about
does the program under the prior statute to protect america act look at this exact mechanism of targeting persons overseas and held it against the constitutional challenge. that's why it hasn't been reported a very much but that is an opinion of the court review, arbuckle three that have looked at the program and said that it is unlawful. it's hard for me to imagine an oversight regime that would exceed that. the problem -- >> i don't think you are using that -- >> you have to look at the core to -- court. we were prosecutors and seat to get a first warrant. you go to the judge and present the facts and i am not aware of any country in the world that has anything like the court so you could make it adversarial and slow it down and rest. the problem i think is there's a lack of confidence. it is somewhere below headlights and above right now. >> it's hard for us because in the community we depend on the relationship with the intelligence committee to provide the legitimacy that we need in the program to carry them forward. >> where is the abuse? ayaan understand some people th
to extend your driving range. no wonder volt is america's best-selling plug-in. that's american ingenuity to find new roads. right now, get a 2013 chevrolet volt for around $269 per month. i'm bethand i'm michelle. and we own the paper cottage. it's a stationery and gifts store. anything we purchase for the paper cottage goes on our ink card. so you can manage your business expenses and access them online instantly with the game changing app from ink. we didn't get into business to spend time managing receipts, that's why we have ink. we like being in business because we like being creative, we like interacting with people. so you have time to focus on the things you love. ink from chase. so you can. >>> despite the slow economic recovery, gallup has found that only about a third of american adults prepare a household budget. some economic analysts say that could be making many of us less financially secure and in a way, less free. tom foreman has this week's "american journey." >> four slices. >> reporter: grabbing a pizza on the run is a treat ellen and joe wong enjoy. even with modest
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